DEICING SALT INJURES TREES


Deicing compounds used on highways, driveways and sidewalks in winter contain sodium chloride (table salt) and/or calcium chloride. These chemicals are toxic to trees. Roadside trees are injured when salt is absorbed by their foliage and roots. Avoid or minimize the use of salt around your trees.

  1. Mature sugar maple too
       close to road
  2. Advanced decay in roadside
       trees is a safety hazard
  3. Young white pine too close
       to road
  4. Salt-injured red pine
  5. Dying branches as a result
       of salt injury
Salt spray from roads can seriously injure trees. Dying branches on roadside trees are early signs of salt injury.

Salt injury on pine needles...and maple leaves.
Uniform browning of needles
indicates salt injury.
Dry, brittle leaf edges
often indicate salt injury.


These trees are relatively tolerant of salt spray from traffic or saltwater runoff:
  • AUSTRIAN PINE
  • BIG TOOTH ASPEN
  • BIRCHES
  • BLACK CHERRY
  • BLACK LOCUST
  • QUAKING ASPEN
  • RED CEDAR
  • RED OAK
  • RUSSIAN OLIVE
  • WHITE ASH
  • WHITE OAK
  • WHITE SPRUCE
  • YEWS

These trees are relatively intolerant of salt spray from traffic or saltwater runoff:
  • BASSWOOD
  • DOUGLAS-FIR
  • HEMLOCK
  • IRONWOOD
  • PONDEROSA PINE
  • RED MAPLE
  • RED PINE
  • SHAGBARK HICKORY
  • SPECKLED ALDER
  • SUGAR MAPLE
  • WHITE PINE

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