Urban and Community Forestry
Outreach Services
Strategies for all Communities
Urban and Community Forestry cover.
Tree planting 1.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
     
INTRODUCTION  
  Background, Committee Focus, Committee Tasks
TOC 1.
   
STEP ONE
  Learn About the Diversity of the Population in Your Area
   
STEP TWO
  Identify Groups and Opportunities
     
STEP THREE
TOC 2.
  Cultivate Relationships and Build Trust
   
STEP FOUR
  Develop a Communications Strategy
   
STEP FIVE
  Encourage an Outreach Work Environment  
   
TOC 3.
STEP SIX
  Implement Community Outreach Programs
   
STEP SEVEN
  Monitor Your Plan and Follow Up
   
RESOURCES  
  Resources and Websites
TOC 4.
   
SUCCESS STORIES:
  Alabama, Hawaii, Alaska, Maryland
   
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND REFERENCES
  Special Thanks, References, Committee Members

 

 

HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE

This guide is intended to help you work with diverse population groups in your community. To begin, we encourage you to learn more about the diversity of the population in your area. Next, you determine how to reach various segments of the population by cultivating relationships and targeting communications. Ultimately, by using this process, you will develop and implement outreach efforts, and support a work environment that promotes these activities.

The steps, resources, and success stories in this publication are intended to help you provide service to all communities. Each page provides space for you to write down information and notes. As you work through and complete the various steps, the result will be an effective outreach plan for your specific needs. Future updates to this guide can be found at www.treelink.org.

 

INTRODUCTION

Urban forestry programs impact more diverse population groups than any other state forestry agency activity. When planning or delivering program services, state urban forestry coordinators may struggle to identify, understand, and involve all diverse groups. In these situations, program delivery tends to favor some traditional groups while unintentionally leaving out others.

State and territory urban forestry coordinators addressed this issue during their meeting at the National Urban Forest Conference held in Washington, D.C. on September 4, 2001. A committee was formed to explore how to improve program delivery to population groups generally not engaged in urban forestry activities.


THE COMMITTEE INCLUDES STATE AND FEDERAL URBAN AND COMMUNITY FORESTRY REPRESENTATIVES FROM DIFFERENT REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES.  
Intro 1.
  THIS GUIDE IS THE RESULT OF THE COMMITTEE’S COLLABORATIVE EFFORT.

 

COMMITTEE FOCUS
Develop and assemble information and strategies that can be used by state forestry agencies and other organizations to provide universal service and access to urban forestry programs.

COMMITTEE TASKS
(1) Compile strategies, resources, and success stories into final format for use by state urban forestry coordinators and other programs, (2) provide status reports to state foresters, (3) distribute the guide to all urban and community forestry state and federal coordinators and appropriate partners, and (4) present an oral report, including recommended follow-up activities at the next National Urban Forestry Coordinators meeting in 2003.

 

STEP ONE

Learn About the Diversity of the Population in Your Area.

Define the composition and diversity of your population by using such tools as the U.S. Census information at: www.census.gov.







Step One 1.
List the “non-traditional” partners that you would like to involve.


ACTION STEPS:

  Step One 2.










 

 

STEP TWO

Identify Groups and Opportunities.

  • Review your program to determine opportunities for participation.

  • Focus outreach efforts towards selected groups.

  • Match groups with opportunities.

Step Two 1.

 

 

ACTION STEPS:

 

Step Two 2.

Step Two 3.

Step Two 4.











 

 

STEP THREE

Cultivate Relationships and Build Trust.

  • Step Three 1.Talk with the proposed group.

  • Choose a realistic project goal.

  • Approach the goal in a format comfortable to the group.

  • Develop strategies with the community to help them achieve their goal.

    • Set up a planning committee.

    • Identify individuals with specific skills/resources who can help achieve the goal.

  • Monitor and provide support to communities.

 

Step Three 2.

ACTION STEPS:

 

Step Three 3.

 











 

 

STEP FOUR

Develop a Communications Strategy.

  • Determine the aspects of your program that you want to communicate.

  • Step Four 1.Keep communications clear.

  • Print materials in appropriate languages whenever necessary.

  • Use different types of media:

    • Place announcements in local newspapers.

    • Distribute brochures and flyers to groups.

    • Put up posters in gathering places.

    • Create public service announcements for radio.

    • Attend local meetings, fairs and other public events.

    • Use the web to deliver your message.

  • Use approaches appropriate for the audience. (e.g., talk with community groups, make personal visits, attend local events.)

ACTION STEPS:











 

 

STEP FIVE

Encourage an Outreach Work Environment.

Identify processes that will help provide universal services to all groups.

  • Address internal barriers that may prevent anyone from participating. For example:

    • Parking is adequate and ramp accessible.

    • Assistive listening devices are available and signs are marked in Braille.

    • Hours are adjusted to meet the needs of the community or group.
Step Five 1.   Step Five 2.

 

ACTION STEPS:











 

 

STEP SIX

Implement Community Outreach Programs.

  • Step Six 1.Develop a checklist of activities to complete the project that you and the group have chosen.

  • Be sure the group is prepared to implement the project and that appropriate training is being provided.

  • Stay involved with the group and their goals.

  • Step Six 2. Celebrate the completion of the project.

Step Six 4.Step Six 3.

Step Six 5.

 

ACTION STEPS:











 

 

STEP SEVEN

Monitor Your Plan and Follow Up.

Return to steps one and two periodically and compare the diversity level of current outreach program participants to the potential participants in your area.

  • Step Seven 1.Evaluate the success of projects as they are concluded.

  • Seek feedback from the project participants.

  • Determine what helped to make each project a success and what did not.

  • Maintain established relationships.

  • Cultivate new relationships.

  • Make adjustments to your outreach program and continue the efforts.

  • Have fun!

ACTION STEPS:











 

 

OUTREACH RESOURCES AND WEBSITES

Additional resources to support your outreach activities can be found by contacting national, state and local organizations or visiting their websites.

AGENCIES:

Federal
USDA Forest Service Urban and Community Forestry, www.fs.fed.us/ucf

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, www.nrcs.usda.gov

US Census Bureau, www.census.gov

National Council on Disability, www.ncd.gov

Bureau of Indian Affairs, www.doiu.nbc.gov/orientation/bia2.cfm

State
Governors Office, www.nga.org

Universities – Office of Multicultural Affairs

Department of Special Needs & Disabilities

Department of Social Services

 

ORGANIZATIONS:

The following websites feature specific outreach tools and techniques of interest. This is a sampling of the many resources available on this subject.

Community Outreach Partnership Centers (Housing and Urban Development),
www.oup.org/about/aboutcopc.html

Disabled American Veterans, www.dav.org

Federal Asian Pacific American Council, www.fapac.org/f1

Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, www.hacu.net

International Society of Arboriculture – Hispanic website, www.isahispana.com

League of United Latin American Citizens, www.lulac.org

Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (website under development)

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), www.naacp.org

National Congress of American Indians, www.ncai.org

National Institute of Environmental Health Science – Health Disparities Research,
www.niehs.nih.gov/oc/factsheets/disparity/community.htm

Tree link, www.treelink.org and www.treelink.org/nucfac

 

RESOURCE MATERIALS:

Definitions of Key Outreach Concepts,
www.ssi.nrcs.usda.gov/publications/2_Tech_Reports/T005_OutreachDefinition.pdf

Developing a Hispanic Outreach Program that Works,
www.resna.org/taproject/library/atq/hispanic.htm

Reaching Our Children: A Compendium of Outreach Models,
ftp://ftp.hrsa.gov/pubs/outreach.pdf

Strategies for Effective Health Outreach to African American Communities,
www.omhrc.gov/us-uk/rjmomh.pdf

What is Outreach? – USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service (click on “site map” and look for “outreach” section: www.il.nrcs.usda.gov


 

 

SUCCESS STORY:

Diversity Outreach Meeting — Alabama Urban Forestry Partnership.

Success Story 1.Project Statement: Employ a model format to engage diverse community representatives with local government service providers to determine urban forestry delivery.

Location: Goodwater, Alabama.

Background: During an on-line chat with Lisa Burban and Ed Macie, the US Forest Service announced that it had funded a project to develop a standardized format to help state agencies to “Engage the Non-engaged Urban Audiences” such as minority groups and small communities. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System requested that this model format be tested in the state. The Forest Service agreed and arranged to bring Professor Maureen McDonough, Michigan State University, to oversee the use of this format in the state.

Activities: Three targeted communities: Colony, Goodwater, and Pleasant Grove were invited to participate. All three met the criteria of representing communities and groups who had not benefited fully from the state’s urban forestry program or who had large black populations. Alabama’s Urban Forestry Technical Committee provided facilitators and coordination for the meeting, with local arrangements provided by Goodwater. County Extension agents and Forestry Commission personnel provided local support and participated in the meetings. The Forest Service provided transportation and logistical support.

The three-hour meeting included small group discussions about the community they lived in, concerns about urban trees, previous encounters with service providers, barriers that keep them from participating in programs, and suggestions to improve agency support. At the conclusion all groups were reconvened and observations were shared.

Results: Colony and Goodwater received for the first time U&CF Financial Assistance Awards and also technical assistance from local government service providers. This model format was made a program objective in Alabama’s five-year strategic plan.

 

Hawai`i’s TREE Center Youth Exchange Program
Sharing of Cultures and Caring for the Land.

Project Statement: To launch a Youth Exchange Program Sharing of Cultures, Caring for the Land (Malama Aina).

Success Story 2.Location: On the slopes of Mauna Loa in Kealakekua, Hawai`i.

Background: The Tropical Refor-estation and Ecosystems Education Center (TREE Center) opened Camp Papaloa’s Trees as Habitat Nature Awareness and Education Camp for Hawai`i’s children, ages 9-14 in July 2000. Since then youth from California, Missouri, and Louisiana have participated in the camp experience.

With the growing popularity of Camp Papaloa, and a goal to expand children’s learning experiences, the TREE Center created a Youth Exchange Program Sharing Cultures and Caring for the Land (Malama Aina). The US Forest Service awarded ‘seed’ money for the project and the Alaska Association of Conservation Districts committed to supporting the program.

Activities: In August 2001, the Alaska team comprised of the US Forest Service State & Private Land-Alaska and The Mid-Yukon Kuskokwim Soil and Water Conservation District traveled to Camp Papaloa to ‘work’ the camp to gain first hand experience. In August 2002, the Hawai`i team traveled to Anchorage and Aniak, Alaska to conduct site visits, to meet Alaska natives, staff of Kuspuk School District, staff of Kuskokwim Native Association, and the director of Civil Rights and Tribal Government Relations-Alaska Region.

Results: In March 2003, TREE Center and its partners will launch the Youth Exchange Program with Alaska Yupik Eskimos from Aniak, Alaska, in a week long camping experience with Hawai`i youths. In June 2003, Hawai`i youths will travel to Alaska to continue their learning experience with their Yupik Eskimo friends.

Funding: TREE Center received funding for the Youth Exchange Program from Bishop Museum, Change Happens Foundation, Bill Healy Foundation, Kukio Foundation, and the US Forest Service.

 

Environmental Outreach, Education, and Tree Planting in Annapolis, Maryland.

Success Story 3.Project Statement: To develop a program for the growing Hispanic population that would create an awareness and appreciation for our watershed, educate them on the role of trees in urban areas, and inspire community involvement in the re-greening of local neighborhoods.

Location: City of Annapolis, Maryland.

Background: The Maryland Forest Service goals are to promote the planting and nurturing of trees and protect the environment and our grand estuary, the Chesapeake Bay. In response to the needs of the growing Spanish-speaking population, the Maryland DNR Forest Service created an environmental pilot project.

Activities: After eight months of planning and with the help of many organizations and volunteers, 80 trees were planted and a brochure was printed. The Annapolis Transit provided bus transportation, bandanas and work gloves. The City of Annapolis Parks & Recreation selected the planting site. The United States Naval Academy Latino Club members attended a tree planting workshop, then served as bilingual supervisors on planting day. A bilingual city police department representative communicated the message about the value of trees in the urban environment, and the importance of healthy streams, rivers, and the Chesapeake Bay. Bartlett Tree Experts provided wood chips for mulch and other logistical support. The County Health Department shared their understanding of the Hispanic culture. A local restaurant donated food and drinks, and a local newspaper wrote about the activity.

A grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust (MD’s environmental license plates) funded the printing of the Guide to Tree Planting and Care brochure in English and Spanish, and the purchase of 80 trees.

Results: Several Hispanic scout groups and church youth groups continue to weed, water, and re-mulch the original planted trees. Additional projects organized by and involving Hispanic communities are occurring in growing numbers throughout the state. The DNR Forest Service continues to support these projects.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND REFERENCES

Special Thanks
The Committee used the following references throughout this document. We wish to thank the authors for their work as it helped to guide our efforts.

References
Gibson, C. & Stein, S. 2001. USDA Forest Service Staff Reaching Out: A USDA Forest Service Toolkit for Equal Participation. FS-721 S.

Kuo, E.E. & Sullivan,W.C. (2001). University of Illinois, Human-Environment Research Laboratory, Urbana-Champaign.

McDonough, M., Russell, K., Burban, L., & Nancarrow, L. 2003. Dialogue on Diversity: Broadening the Voices in Urban and Community Forestry.

Committee Members

Mark Bays
    Oklahoma

Lisa Burban
    USDA Forest Service NA

Paul Dolan
    Rhode Island

Chris Donnelly
    Connecticut

Terry Galloway
    Maryland

Liz Gilland
    South Carolina

 

Neil Letson
    Alabama

Ashley Mulis
    Indiana

Harold Taft
    Alabama

Teresa Trueman-Madriaga
    Hawai`i

Iris Magaly Zayas
   USDA Forest Service
   Southern Region

 

Funds for this publication were provided by the National Association of State Foresters through a grant from the USDA Forest Service. A special thank you to the state and federal agencies for photographic images contained in this document.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or familial status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call 202-720-5964 (voice or TDD). USDA is an equal employment opportunity provider and employer.

 

 
September 2003